A template letter can be found here.

You can find out who your MP is and their email here.

Our recent article about The Acting Class and class inequality in the UK.

An Open Letter To Baroness Williams

We are working with The Equality Trust and Just Fair to use The Acting Class to help promote a campaign that urges the UK Government to implement the Socio-Economic Duty of the Equality Act 2010.

This provision requires public bodies to adopt effective and transparent policies to reduce the inequalities that result from socio-economic disadvantage. However although on the statute book, successive governments have failed to implement the Duty.

You can add pressure on the government to recognise socio-economic inequality in a meaningful way by writing to your MP and asking them to support the Early Day Motion 591 that calls on the government to bring the Socio-Economic Duty into effect. Our recent article about The Acting Class and class inequality in the UK.

of the Equality Act

Socio-Economic Duty

to implement the

campaign

#1ForEquality

It is by telling stories that a society talks to itself, finds out about itself and engages with the rest of the world. What kind of stories do we tell if only 10% of actors come from working class backgrounds?

This film talks to struggling actors about the difficulties they face when they don’t have the resources to get in and get on in the industry. We follow actor Tom Stocks who had to twice turn down a place at the East 15 drama school because he could not afford the fees. Angered by this Tom set up Actor Awareness and the film documents his struggle to create opportunities for those outside the elite networks and raise awareness about class exclusion in the acting industry.

Actors Chris Eccleston, Julie Hesmondhalgh, Maxine Peake, Samuel West and others talk about why this situation should concern everyone and how things have got harder since they entered the industry. This is not a film about acting; it’s about the lack of working class representation on our stages and our screens. It’s a story of social inequality and how that impacts on the performing arts.